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Procedure - Esophageal Manometry

The esophagus is a muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. Patients in Utah with an esophageal disorder can have difficulty or pain when swallowing, muscle spasms, and severe acid-reflux. Generally, your doctor will first take X-rays to rule out an obstruction in the throat, but if none is found, an Ogden Clinic specialist will use an esophageal manometry to determine the cause of your symptoms. This procedure is able to diagnose various conditions that may affect the health of your esophagus, by measuring the muscle contractions that occur when you swallow. Some of these conditions include:

  • Esophageal spasm: This swallowing problem causes people to have forceful and unexpected muscle contractions of the esophagus.
  • Scleroderma: This is a rare condition that affects very few people. For those with Scleroderma, however, they experience severe gastroesophageal reflux because the muscles in the lower part of the esophagus stop working.
  • Achalasia: Another uncommon condition, Achalasia results when the lower esophageal muscle doesn’t relax properly. This prevents food from entering the stomach, which can lead to regurgitation.

How It Works

An esophageal manometry is an outpatient procedure that is done without sedation, only local numbing spray or gel. To start your procedure, you will be seated and a specialist will apply the numbing spray to your throat and/or numbing gel to the inside of your nose. A catheter will then be inserted through your nose and down into your esophagus.

Once the catheter is in place, you will be asked to swallow small sips of water. Each time you swallow, the catheter will send a signal to a computer measuring the strength and pressure, as well as the pattern, of the muscle contractions in your esophagus. It is important to remain as still as possible during the procedure, and take slow, even breaths. Your specialist may also move the catheter down to the stomach to take additional measurements. An esophageal manometry test typically lasts half an hour.

To properly diagnose esophageal disorders, Ogden Clinic specialists use esophageal manometry tests in Utah. If you are having trouble swallowing or experiencing muscle spasms in your esophagus, contact us today for an appointment.


Egan, Stacie, FNP-C
6028 S. Ridgeline Drive
Ogden, UT
801-475-3380

Vandersteen, Joshua, DO
6028 S. Ridgeline Drive
Ogden, UT
801-475-3380

Ziegler, Robert, MD
1159 East 12th Street
Ogden, UT
801-475-3700